60 YEARS OF CHANGING LIVES
Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee is based in Nashville, Tenn. The organization employs about 2,000 people and serves 48 counties throughout Middle and West Tennessee. We operate 34 retail stores and two outlet stores, more than 75 donation sites and eight Career Solutions centers.

Founded in 1957 as a not-for-profit, Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee’s mission is changing lives through education, training and employment.

At Goodwill we believe in giving a hand up, not a handout a saying coined by Goodwill’s founder, the Rev. Edgar J. Helms. Helms worked as a missionary in the slums of Boston in the early 1900s. He hired the poor and needy to mend and repair used goods he collected from wealthy Bostonians. The refurbished items were resold, and the proceeds were paid as wages to the people who did the work. This became the basis for the mission of Goodwills throughout the U.S. and abroad.

Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee is based in Nashville, Tenn. The agency employs about 2,000 people and serves 48 counties throughout Middle and West Tennessee.

We operate 34 retail stores and two outlet stores, more than 75 donation sites and eight Career Solutions centers. Eighty-eight percent of our employees come to Goodwill in connection with its mission, and we remain one of Middle and West Tennessee’s largest employers of people with disabilities.

Although affiliated with Goodwill Industries International in Bethesda, Md., we operate independently through our own governing board of directors.

Goodwill accepts gently-used items that donors no longer want, need or use. Those items are sold either in our retail stores or online at onlinegoodwill.com. Revenue from the sale of donated goods helps fund job training services and programs provided by Goodwill Career Solutions, which assists thousands of Tennesseans each year.

SUCCESS STORIES
York

York

For 28 years, York has been a fixture at Goodwill and an example of the power of its mission. York, who has Down Syndrome, is part of a group of about 20 people with intellectual or developmental disabilities who work together hanging clothes and processing donations at the Rivergate Goodwill in Madison. They are affectionately known as the “A-Team.” As the group’s founding member, York has his own nickname — “Ladies’ Man,” based on his fondness for blowing kisses. Though a man of few words, York loves joking with his co-workers and discussing sports and the weather. Mention rain to sun-loving York, and you’ll likely hear, “Not today!” York’s mother, Elizabeth, recalls that when he turned 18, he no longer wanted to attend school. He worked briefly in other settings but never seemed settled until he took a job at Goodwill in 1989. The job has given him a sense of purpose and accomplishment all these years, she says, adding “It’s the people at Goodwill and their caring and encouragement that’s made all the difference.”

Lynn

Lynn

Lynn was in her early 30s when a car crash sent her life careening off course. She drove head-on into a metal pole in clear view. Although she was uninjured, she scheduled a visit with an eye doctor. Lynn learned diabetes was destroying her vision. After two failed surgeries, she was completely blind. Lynn could no longer perform the duties of her job of 11 years. After that, she could not find work for a year. Making matters worse, friendships that were strong before Lynn lost her sight began to fade. She found herself increasingly isolated and without purpose. “To be honest,” she says, “I wanted to die.” In 2016, Lynn went to Goodwill for help. She was hired as a greeter at the Mt. Juliet Goodwill store. Now, at 39, Lynn’s world is coming back into focus. Her job allows her to talk to dozens of new people every week and fills her with a sense of accomplishment. “I feel like I have a life again,” she adds. “I love this job.”

Byron

Byron 

The shotgun slug that tore off one of Byron’s legs and badly injured the other ultimately saved his life. “No doubt about it,” he says, “I know that was God intervening for me.” Byron grew up in Nashville. For decades he ran with gangs, addicted to drugs. One day in 1997, he stumbled into the wrong neighborhood and got shot. Three years later, after surviving a coma and surgeries and getting treatment for addiction, Byron was referred to Goodwill. There he met Karl Houston, who is now Goodwill’s senior director of marketing and community relations. Houston took a chance on the desperate man. “He didn’t know I had something to prove to myself,” Byron recalls. He has been with Goodwill ever since. Today, Byron supervises Goodwill Donation Express Centers in the Nashville area. He is married with four children, nine grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. He is a deacon of his church and ministers weekly to the homeless at Nashville’s Room at the Inn. “I’m a prime example of what Goodwill does,” Byron says.

Saini

Saini 

Saini wears a ring, given to her by her oldest daughter, on a chain around her neck and a tropical flower in her hair. Other memories of her native American Samoa — and her family there — fill her heart. But in 2016, Saini traveled with her son from the U.S. territory in the South Pacific to Tennessee, where she now lives with a childhood friend in Clarksville. The mother of three left her own mom, her husband and two children behind in hopes of finding a job to better their financial situation. She needed money for another reason as well: to end her 67-year-old mother’s long wait for kidney surgery. Despite limited English and poor mobility because of knee problems, she found a job at Goodwill. She learned to sort electronics and other goods, and her English improved. Today, Saini is a star performer, beloved by her co-workers whom she calls family. And her mom is healthy after a successful operation. “Goodwill made my dreams come true,” she said.

OUR IMPACT

IMPACT ON INDIVIDUALS WITH BARRIERS TO EMPLOYMENT

  • Unemployed or Dislocated Worker

  • $72%/mo
  • Criminal Background

  • $6.7%/mo
  • Lack of GED/ High School Equivalency

  • $4.2%/mo
  • Other Disadvantages

  • $3.8%/mo
  • Older Worker

  • $3.4%/mo
  • Homeless

  • $3.3%/mo
  • Welfare Recipient

  • $2.2%/mo
  • Working Poor, Underemployed

  • $1.2%/mo
  • Lack of/Low Literacy

  • $.09%/mo
  • At-Risk Youth

  • $.07%/mo
  • Non-English Speaking

  • $.05%/mo
  • History of Substance Abuse

  • $.02%/mo

IMPACT ON INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES

Disabling Condition0%

Psychiatric and/or Emotional Disability0%

Learning Disability other than Autism0%

Developmental Disability / Not Autism0%

Neurological Disability0%

Blindness or Other Visual Impairment0%

Deafness or Other Hearing Impairment0%

IMPACTING PEOPLE OF ALL AGES, GENDERS & RACES

Female

4,138

Male

3,296

Unreported

513

  • 12 people age 0 to 11

  • 28 people age 12 to 15

  • 1950 people age 16 to 24

  • 2391 people age 25 to 34

  • 1172 people age 34 to 44

  • 1147 people age 45 to 54

  • 1247 people age 55 plus

3242

WHITE

3283

BLACK

500

MULTI RACIAL

92

Asian, Pacific Islander

47

American Indian, Eskimo, Aleut

783

Unreported Race

IMPACT ON THE ENVIRONMENT

POUNDS OF SALVAGE AND RECYCLABLE MATERIAL WERE DIVERTED FROM LANDFILLS

32,381,981

TREES SAVED BY PAPER RECYCLING EFFORTS

47,500

NUMBER POUNDS OF CARDBOARD AND PAPER PULP RECYCLED

5,673,274

REVENUE FROM ALL SALVAGE & RECYCLING

4,608,817

FINANCIALS

TOTAL RECEIVED =
$72,162,284

  • SALES OF GOODS

    $64,289,637
  • GRANTS FOR REHABILITATION SERVICES

    $411,329
  • INVESTMENT INCOME

    $140,913
  • INCREASE OF INVESTMENTS

    $768,336
  • SALE OF LAND, BUILDINGS & EQUIPMENT

    $5,303,108
  • UNITED WAY SUPPORT

    $40,886
  • OTHER

    $1,208,075

TOTAL GIVEN =
$69,994,239

  • SALES PROGRAM

    $58,776,524
  • MISSION SERVICES

    $3,739,636
  • GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE

    $6,798,726
  • FUNDRAISING

    $679,353
LEADERSHIP
SENIOR LEADERS

Matthew Bourlakas
President and CEO

Ralph Forsythe
Chief Financial Officer

Christopher Burr
Sr. Director of Donated Goods

Mike Eisenbraun
Sr. Director of Operations

Matt Gloster
Sr. Director of Career Solutions

Karl Houston
Sr. Director of Marketing & Community Relations

Mary La Haie
Sr. Director of Accounting

Ed O’Kelley
Sr. Director of Information Technology

Karen Samuel
Sr. Director of Human Resources

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
OFFICERS

Chairperson
Julie Wilson

Senior Vice President, Asset Management
Healthcare Realty Trust

Vice Chairperson
Dave Fentress
Vice President, Internal Audit
Dollar General Corporation

Secretary
Chad M. Grout
Principal Broker
Urban Grout Commercial Real Estate

Treasurer
Bryan L. Bean

Senior Vice President
Pinnacle Financial Partners

Legal Counsel
Christopher S. Dunn
Waller Lansden
Dortch & Davis, LLP Attorneys

Past Chair
Fred McLaughlin

Senior Vice President, Investments
Robert W. Baird & Co., Inc.

Matthew Bourlakas
President and CEO
Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee

Ralph Forsythe
Chief Financial Officer
Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee

DIRECTORS

Woodretta Allen
Cost Containment Manager
United Parcel Service

Bryan L. Bean
First Vice President
SunTrust Bank

Andrew Davidson
Account Executive
Frank E. Neal & Co., Inc.

Dave Fentress
Vice President, Internal Audit
Dollar General Corporation

James B. Foley
Vice President

CBRE, Inc.

Kathryn S. Gibson
Assistant Director
VUMC Finance

Chad Grout, CCIM
Principal Broker
Urban Grout Commercial Real Estate

Ryan R. Loyd
VP – Deputy Chief Accounting Officer
Cigna-Health Spring

Christine E. Skold
VP, Investor Relations,
Strategy & Continuous Improvement
Tractor Supply Company

Todd A. Spaanstra
CPA/Partner
Crowe Horwarth, LLP

John W. Stone, III
Partner

White & Reasor, PLC

John C. Tishler 
Chairman
Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP

Ms. Julie F. Wilson
Senior Vice President, Asset Management
Healthcare Realty Trust

Jeff Young
Vice President
Tennessee Bank & Trust

TRUSTEES

Robert Duthie, Chair
CEO/Founder
Duthie Associates, dba Duthie Learning

Robert McNeilly, III
President & CEO
SunTrust Bank – Nashville

Kathryn I. Thompson
Partner, CEO

Thompson Research Group